What is PepZin GI aka Zinc Carnosine?

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Some of you may have read my experiment with PepZin GI. But what is it?

PepZin GI is Zinc Carnosine. A combination of Zinc and L-Carnosine. This was developed in Japan in the 1980s and started use in Japan in the 1990s. In Europe it is patented by a company named Lonza and in the USA sold under the different brands with the marketing name PepZin GI.

Zinc Carnosine was primarily developed to heal stomach ulcers and it works. People with leaky gut are suspected with having stomach ulcers. Heal the ulcers, heal the leaky gut right? Cure the leaky guy and stop the polluting of blood. With clean blood, the kidneys and the liver do not need to be overloaded and form stones. It will put an end to kidney cleansing and liver cleansing. No more stones in the future. That’s the theory. It has worked for some.

Will try it on myself and my brother.

I found this great online book that explains many things about Zinc Carnosine. Check it out. The book is Ulcer Free: A Natural Approach to Ulcer Treatment.

Introduction

As a scientist, I am always astonished by the advancements medical researchers are making in the development of life-saving drugs. As a physician, I clearly understand the public’s growing interest in natural remedies that enable the body to heal itself. And as a teacher, I can’t help but tell people about a treatment that combines a natural approach to healing and is grounded in actual scientific research. Zinc-Carnosine is just such a breakthrough.

Having had a long-standing interest in the treatment of ulcers, as I pointed out in the book’s Introduction, I was made aware of Zinc-Carnosine several years ago. Because of my position as a visiting professor at the University of Hong Kong’s medical school, I was fortunate enough to come across a number of reports on Zinc-Carnosine. The scientific literature seemed very credible. As it turns out, Zinc-Carnosine has had remarkable success in Japan as a treatment for peptic ulcer disease, but the supplement is hardly known in North America and Europe. Hopefully, this book will change that.

Zinc-Carnosine deserves consideration as a first-line ulcer treatment in this part of the world. Besides ulcers, Zinc-Carnosine is valuable for treating gastritis and dyspepsia. The supplement represents a natural healing approach to stomach ailments. Instead of obstructing an action of the stomach—blocking acid production, neutralizing hydrochloric acid—Zinc-Carnosine strengthens the stomach’s mucosal defenses. The supplement harnesses the stomach’s natural ability to fight disease, battle infection, and heal itself.

This chapter explains what Zinc-Carnosine is and examines whether it is safe. I look at how the supplement heals ulcers and relieves ulcer pain. In the second half of this chapter, I examine the science behind Zinc-Carnosine. I will cite many studies that show how Zinc-Carnosine achieves its healing power. However, let’s start at the beginning, and look at zinc and L-carnosine—the two components of Zinc-Carnosine— separately.

HOW ZINC CARNOSINE HEALS ULCERS

Zinc-Carnosine relieves stomach pain, heals ulcers, and perhaps prevents them. How? The supplement works by strengthening the stomach mucosa, sticking to the stomach wall and acting as a buffer to gastric acid, serving as an antioxidant, controlling the inflammatory response to stomach injury, and inhibiting the growth of H. pylori bacteria. You’ll learn more about each of these important actions directly below, and will discover the technical details of Zinc-Carnosine’s mode of action later in the chapter.

Strengthens the Stomach Mucosa

The lining of the stomach is protected from its own caustic gastric juice by a thin gel-like layer of mucus. When this mucus layer erodes, the stomach lining is exposed, and you can get an ulcer. Evidence suggests that Zinc-Carnosine works primarily by strengthening the mucosal barrier between the stomach lining and the harsh gastric juices of the stomach. The supplement appears to adhere to the stomach wall to provide protection to all areas of the stomach. These studies give a picture of Zinc-Carnosine’s protective effect on the stomach lining:

In an early study conducted at the Yokohama Red Cross Hospital in 1992, twenty-five patients whose ulcers were confirmed by endoscopy were given 75 mg Zinc-Carnosine tablets twice daily (one after breakfast and one before bed) for eight weeks. Drugs such as H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors that might affect the results of the study were prohibited. The “disappearance rate” of epigastric pain symptoms in the patients was 53.3 percent after meals, 76.9 percent fasting, and 90.9 percent at night. Of the twenty-five subjects who had a final assessment by endoscopy after the eight weeks, 65 percent were healed of their gastric ulcers. This study is interesting because the ulcers were healed without suppressing the production of acid. Zinc-Carnosine was able to provide a genuine protective effect to the stomach.

In a double-blind study of three groups taking 50-mg, 75-mg, or 100-mg Zinc-Carnosine tablets twice daily for eight weeks, the success rates of the study as obtained by endoscopy were as follows: 50.8 percent for 100-mg group, 58.6 percent for 150-mg group, and 53.6 percent for 200-mg group.

These studies show very clearly that Zinc-Carnosine has a protective effect on the stomach, and that the supplement’s healing action is not based solely on its role as a buffer of stomach acid.

Adheres to the Stomach Wall

Like bismuth and to a lesser degree sucralfate, Zinc-Carnosine coats the stomach and acts as a barrier between ulcers and hydrochloric acid. In this way, it protects ulcer sores from irritation by acid, relieves pain, and permits the sores to heal. In a 1992 study called “The gastric mucosal adhesiveness of Z-103 (Zinc-Carnosine) in rats with chronic ulcer,” M. Seiki et al. concluded, “(Zinc-Carnosine) shows a long-term adhesive and permeable action on the gastric mucosa in acetic acid ulcer rats, and it has a comparable high affinity at the ulcerous site.” The scientists attributed Zinc-Carnosine’s adhesiveness to its zinc content. They also noted that the strength and duration of adhesiveness was dose-dependent, which indicates that Zinc-Carnosine has a genuine adhesive effect in the stomach.

Acts as an Antioxidant

More so than most other organs, the stomach is subject to oxidative stress from alcohol, swallowed tobacco smoke or juice, and other harmful substances. Zinc-Carnosine acts as an antioxidant to prevent these substances from eroding the stomach lining. I describe experiments involving Zinc-Carnosine and its antioxidant properties in the second half of this chapter.

Tempers the Inflammatory Process

Inflammation is a natural response of the immune system to injury. Nevertheless, too much inflammation in the stomach can cause ­gastritis and painful ulcers. In experiments, the supplement Zinc-Carnosine retarded the TNF-alpha secretion of interleukin-8, a ­molecule involved in the inflammatory process. The supplement therefore appears to modulate the immune-system response and keep inflammation in check.

Inhibits H. Pylori

H. pylori bacteria are responsible for seventy-five percent of stomach ulcers worldwide. Zinc-Carnosine inhibits the growth of the bacteria, probably by strengthening the stomach mucosa and making it less susceptible to a bacterial infection.

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Comments

  1. Linda Grace says

    I am taking this supplement, since I have had a long history of stamoch and acid reflux problems. I am now over the eight week period and wonder whether I can continue at the two dose a day rate?

  2. Steven Sponaugle says

    You might want to have your red cell minerals measured, since zinc, copper, manganese and molybdenum all compete for absorption. An excess of zinc can suppress levels of the other three minerals. We sometimes need to supplement patients with copper, when we find an excess of dopamine relative to norepinephrine or microcytic anemia,

    Steven Sponaugle, Research Director, Florida Detox and Wellness Institute
    http://www.floridadetox.com

  3. Don says

    How did your experiment go? I think I have severe gastritis possibly ulcer
    can you please recommend a safe diet and supplements to help me?

    Good luck to the both of us
    Don

  4. eesc says

    These supplements were useless.

    I got better results with orange juice fasting.

    I got better results with raw oysters for zing.

    I got better nutrition with raw paleo diet.

    PepZin GI aka Zinc Carnosine did not work for me.

  5. Jason says

    These supplements are NOT useless.

    Orange juice fasting is a myth, and zinc found in food is NOT the same as zinc carnosine.

    A raw/cooked paleo diet is a great way to go for many other reasons (including grain avoidance)

    I got my pepzin GI here http://www.jgsupplements.com/products/Zinc-Carnosine-37.5mg-X-120-Capsules.html

    And it helped me, and it looks like its helped many others too. Only recently there were articles published about how zinc carnosine reduced gut permeability. Found here:

    http://www.healthybowels.com/library/conditions/colon-health/160-study-points-to-zinc-carnosines-role-in-gut-health

  6. eileen says

    I can’t believe that eesc thought that the zinc-carnozine was useless! I had severe gastritis and ulcers. I was on Nexium, then when my insurance wouldn’t cover that anymore, I had to switch to Prilosec. Then I switched to Prevacid because THAT worked better. For five years every time I tried to stop taking these meds, within two days I was doubled over again with stomach pain. I took the zinc-carnozine for the 8 weeks and I SWEAR by this stuff. And no, it is not all in my head. What happens when you stop taking that stuff is that your stomach floods with acid. So, I was on this roller coaster with these medications. I stop people in the store, when their standing in front of the Prevacid counter and tell them about the zinc-carnozine.

  7. frank says

    Steven,
    I thought chelated forms of minerals didn’t compete with each other?

    all the best
    Frank Op de Beeck

  8. Tammy says

    Eileen
    I just discovered this Z-C. I have a six year old that was suffering with reflux. I took him to several doctors and they all said to start him on Prevacid. I am very anti pharma but when he started getting spasmotic croup and couldn’t breath I had to give my steroids. I thought that the Prevacid would be better than the steroids. Soon after starting him on the Prevacid I took him to a Chinese Herbalist. The first thing he said was that I should have my son tested for food intolerances. We did and found that he had a severe intolerance to egg yolks. Eliminating the eggs made a hugh difference. We started trying to wean him off the Prevacid and all hell broke loose. I had no idea how hard it would be to get him off this drug. I’ve gotten him down to 15mg daily from 30mg but the night time reflux is (or was) a problem. He makes it through the day just fine. I was searching for some natural way to support the weaning process. I was told by doctors, pharmacists to use tums, maalox, zantac. I just wanted him off the drugs! Two days ago I was told about this Zinc-C. I gave him 1/2 a tab before bed last night. We both slept great all night. He got up happy and hungry! I’d love to know how you weaned yourself off the Prevacid. Cold turkey? If gradually, please explain. I’d be greatful for any advice and keep telling anybody who will listen about the dangers of these dangerous drugs.

  9. Alinna says

    I am 32, I have been diagnosed with Crohn’s last year and it has taken a harsh toll on all of my joints. Most notably it has triggered a very bad case of ankilosing spondylitis so this means that i’m almost constantly experiencing lower back pain, in the region of the sacro-iliac joints. The only supplements that help with my pain are B3 and Zn-Carnosine. Their effects are spectacular!!! I first took 1 pill of Zn-Carnosine at lunch time and the night that followed I had no back pain at all!!!! Amazing! I’m taking the supplements for 2 weeks now and I’m still enjoying pain free nights. I asked my dr why does it work and to my surprise he had never heard of it and therefore didn’t know how to explain it. I only hope the effects will last!!!

  10. Kathy Nichol says

    I have gastritis brought on by Nsaids. I am 5’4″ and got down to 95 lbs. I have seen 20 doctors and my PCP who is an MD and natural path physician recommended zinc carnosine……she recommended zinlori 75 and I have been on it 3 weeks and it has helped me more than anything…it stopped the burn. I had been on carafate for 4 weeks when I started the zinlori 75 and between the 2 I am improving. It is a slow climb back. I cannot take H2 blockers or Proton Inhibitors as I am one of the 1 or 2% who have horrible side effects from those drugs. I am at least eating again. I now have muscle issues from being just skin and bones but am getting help for that as of a few days ago. Six months ago I was the picture of health, in the gym every other day fit and extremely healthy. Gastritis can destroy your health. Gastroenterologists push the name drugs and don’t do much more than diagnose…I have tried 2 and will not go back to them and these are top in my area just clueless to helping those who are not willing to get onto the drug company gravy train.

    I appreciate the Biotin 10mg and seacure referrals and will talk to my naturepath doc to see if I should add those.

    KN in Texas

  11. says

    Hi Guys I have an ulcer and when it burns it hurts so bad that I can’t even think strate. I have found that coconut oil tablets help with the burning in my stomach.

  12. jody says

    Dear Sir, iterested in this product i am wondering if it will help me with a esophagus ulcer, don’t have h. pylori, don’t smoke or drink any alcohol for that matter. I’ve got this thru stressrelated circumst.
    Thank you, for your help.

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